Recipes: Israeli Salad (סָלָט יְרָקוֹת יִשְׂרְאֵלִי)

(Clockwise) Israeli salad served with sour cream and challah bread. Image credit: Tal
(Clockwise) Israeli salad served with sour cream and challah bread. Image credit: Tal

Shalom everyone! Israeli salad/Israeli vegetable salad (סָלָט יְרָקוֹת יִשְׂרְאֵלִי) or salat yerakot yisra’eli‎ has become one of my favorite dishes. I often eat Israeli salad, served with sour cream and challah bread, as part of breakfast or a light supper in the evenings. Israeli salad actually has Arab origins. It consists primarily of diced tomatoes, cucumbers and parsley, mixed with olive oil, lemon/lime juice and kosher salt. Other ingredients may be added such as diced red onions, bell peppers, and chili peppers. Some even add black or cayenne pepper to the mix. Ingredients vary among different groups of peoples. Add ingredients to and season your salad to taste. The following is my recipe for Israeli salad:

Ingredients: Serves 4 to 6

  • 3 cups of diced tomatoes (about 3 slicer tomatoes)
  • 3 cups of diced cucumbers (about 2 regular cucumbers)
  • 1/4 cup of chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/4 cup of diced red onions
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons of lemon/lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon of kosher salt

Combine tomatoes, cucumbers, parsley, and red onions in a large bowl and toss. Add olive oil, lemon/lime juice and kosher salt. Toss until all ingredients are well-combined and serve.

Israeli salad is usually served with za’ataryogurt, sumac or tahini. I like to eat mine with sour cream. Enjoy!

Film: Divine Knowledge In Torah: Kosher Food Secrets (4 minutes) – Rabbi Yaron Reuven

Shalom Everyone! The following is a video clip from a film by Rabbi Yaron Reuven about the importance of eating kosher food and its relation to Divine knowledge in the Torah. Put simply, you are what you eat. Eating kosher enables us to better fulfill our purpose in life – to know and serve HaShem to the best of our abilities. This video clip is an excerpt from Rabbi Reuven‘s new film “Torah, Science & Ancient Wisdom.”


Full Movie: TORAH, SCIENCE & ANCIENT WISDOM (PART 1) The Movie By BeEzrat HaShem (18 Minutes)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L7IUn…

Divine Knowledge In Torah: Kosher Food Secrets (4 minutes) – Rabbi Yaron Reuven

Video from Yaron Reuven/YouTube

Film: Divine Knowledge In Torah: Kosher Animal Secrets (3 minutes) – Rabbi Yaron Reuven

Shalom Everyone! The following is a video clip from a film by Rabbi Yaron Reuven about kosher animals and their relation to Divine knowledge in the Torah. Though we are permitted to eat meat, HaShem only permits us to eat meat from animals that both chew their cud AND have split-hooves. These animals include cows, sheep, goats, deer, bison, and elk. Among the birds, we are only permitted to eat chickens, turkeys, ducks, and geese. These animals must also be slaughtered with a knife, in a manner that immediately causes death, thereby minimizing/mitigatng any pain or discomfort. The animals we are permitted to eat have internal anatomical features which are conducive to kosher slaughter. These anatomical features have only been “discovered” in the modern era by science, yet, the Divine knowledge in the Torah was well aware of this fact over 3,300 years ago. This video clip is an excerpt from Rabbi Reuven‘s new film “Torah, Science & Ancient Wisdom.”


Full Movie: TORAH, SCIENCE & ANCIENT WISDOM (PART 1) The Movie By BeEzrat HaShem (18 Minutes)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L7IUn…

Divine Knowledge In Torah: Kosher Animal Secrets (3 minutes) – Rabbi Yaron Reuven

Video from Yaron Reuven/YouTube

Food: Traditional Soft, Fluffy Challah for Shabbat – Chabad.org

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A six braid Challah bread with sesame seeds. Image source: Wikipedia.org

Shalom everyone! The following is a video of how to make traditional, soft, fluffy Challah bread for Shabbat from Chabad.org. Challah is a special braided bread traditionally eaten on Shabbat or the holidays. This is both beautiful to watch being made, and wonderful to taste if you get the recipe right. A link to the recipe for this mouthwatering bread is included above the video. Enjoy and good luck with making your Challah bread in time for Shabbat!


Traditional Soft, Fluffy Challah for Shabbat

THE RECIPE: http://chabad.org/2169400?sc=fb

Video from Chabad.org/Facebook

Food: How to Make Ice Cubes Using an Ice Tray

rubbermaid-ice-tray-16-cubes
A plastic ice tray from Rubbermaid with 16 compartments for 16 ice cubes.

Shalom everyone! Making ice cubes is a very simple task that is increasingly becoming lost on a generation used to having ice cube makers in their refrigerators, or purchasing bagged ice from a local supermarket or convenience store. You can easily make ice cubes yourself by using ice trays. An ice tray, usually made of plastic or aluminium, typically has 10 to 16 compartments which yield 10 to 16 ice cubes per tray. Ice trays are generally inexpensive, and are available for purchase in packs of two from the housewares section of any department or discount store. Here is how to make ice cubes using an ice tray:

  1. Using clean cold water, fill a clean empty ice tray to just under the top of each compartment. Be careful not to fill each compartment too much or else the water may spill. It takes about two cups of water to completely fill one ice tray. If you wish to have more than 10 to 16 ice cubes available, then fill two or more ice trays with water.
  2. Open the freezer door and place the water-filled ice tray on a clean flat surface in the freezer. For quicker freezing, place the ice trays in the back of the freezer.
  3. Shut the freezer door and allow the water in the ice trays to freeze completely before emptying them. It typically takes one to two hours for the water to freeze completely. Ice cubes are completely frozen when they have no air bubbles in them.
  4. Once the water is frozen completely, remove the ice tray from the freezer, and remove the ice cubes by gently twisting the ice tray to loosen its contents. Empty the ice cubes into an ice bin and store the bin in the freezer.
  5. Refill the empty ice tray with water and place in the freezer to make another batch of ice cubes, as needed.
  6. Use ice cubes in the ice bin as desired.

It’s that simple. Now you have learned how to make ice cubes on your own.

Food: How to Boil Water

boiling-water
A pot/pan of water boiling on a stove top. Image credit: lifehacker.com

Shalom everyone! Please do not laugh at this post. There are many people out there who do not know how to boil water. None of us were born knowing, and it took many years before we were even allowed near a stove. Then there are those who grew up without ever knowing their way around a kitchen. We will not judge you. Here is how to boil water:

  1. Put some water in a pot, pan or kettle. Be sure not fill it all the way to the top or else the boiled water might splash out and burn you.
  2. Place your pot, pan or kettle containing the water on a stove top burner, and turn the knob for that burner (look at your stove settings) to the highest setting (usually ‘High’ or ‘Hi’)
  3. Allow the water to come to a full boil when bubbles are seen breaking the surface of the water. If the boiling water is in a kettle, you will hear the bubbles crashing against each other. (Hint: Covering your pot or pan helps the water to boil faster)
  4. Turn off the burner and using a potholder, remove the pot, pan or kettle from the hot burner, and place it on a cool burner.
  5. Carefully pour out the desired amount of boiled water into another vessel (cup, flask, bottle, carafe, ice tray, pitcher, pot/pan etc.) for use.

Practice makes perfect. Now try this and no longer be ashamed.

Welcome to Tavlinim.org! About

Shalom everyone! Welcome to Tavlinim.org, a blog about the kosher cuisine in the African Diaspora. My name is Tal and the aim of this blog is share general information about kosher food, kosher recipes, organic farming, and related topics. First let me say that I am not a chef, neither am I an authority on rules of kashrut. At the writing of this blog post, I am a novice in these areas. I seek to learn as much as I can and pass on this information to whomever needs to know. Unfortunately, there are not that many resources devoted to building a kosher food culture in the African Diaspora. It is my hope that this blog will at least begin to change this deficit. As a community, we need to develop a culture of eating only those foods the Creator deemed as fit for our consumption in His Torah.

My favorite cuisines are JamaicanIsraeli, Chinese, Ethiopian, and South Asian, as long as the ingredients and preparation are fit for consumption according to the Torah. This site, however, will not be limited to these types of cuisines; there is great cuisine from all over the world, and I will share these recipes as long as the ingredients and preparation are fit for consumption according to the Torah. Though there are limits on what Torah community is permitted to eat, there is an abundance of foods and delicious recipes of which we may partake and ingrain in our culture to pass on to future generations.

The word “tavlinim” is the Hebrew word for “spices,” an integral part of any cuisine. The singular form of “tavilinim” is “tavlin” or “spice.”  Please visit continue to visit this blog as content will be updated regularly. I look forward to this exciting, enlightening and appetizing journey!